In Many Courtrooms, Bad Interpreters Can Mean Justice Denied

Patricia Michelsen-King was observing the proceedings in a Chesterfield, Virginia, courtroom a few years ago when a man shouted in Spanish from the back of the courtroom, “I didn’t rape anybody!”

Michelsen-King, who teaches Spanish interpretation at Virginia Commonwealth University, said the outburst was the result of bad translation from his court interpreter. Though the man was accused of running a red light, his interpreter told him he was accused of a “violación”… keep reading

Ten must-do tasks for your first year as a freelance translator – Thoughts On Translation

Your first year as a freelancer is a time of overwhelming highs and lows, plus a whole lot of analysis paralysis (Should I work on my website? No, my resume! No, getting certified. No, my marketing plan! No, I have no idea how much to charge, so what on earth am I doing looking for clients…). That reality comes flooding back to me every time I talk to a beginning translator.

As with many hard-but-worthwhile endeavors in life, some of these trials cannot be circumvented; they can only be survived. There’s no way around them, only through them. But I do think that with a little focus, you can ease the stress of your first year as a freelancer. I’ve assembled a list of ten must-do items here
— Read on www.thoughtsontranslation.com/2019/01/29/ten-must-do-tasks-for-your-first-year-as-a-freelance-translator/

The Lifelong Pursuit of Language Learning: How The Vocabularies of Native and Non-Native Speakers Compare (and Why Medical Interpreters Matter)

How do the vocabularies of immigrants to the US compare to those of native speakers. What does the process of learning a new language look like, especially as an adult, and how long does it take? Does a person who appears fluent in English ever need a medical interpreter? Learn more here.
— Read on blog.cyracom.com/the-lifelong-pursuit-of-language-learning-how-the-vocabularies-of-native-and-non-native-speakers-compare