CMIT (Core Medical Interpreter Training Program™) Fall 2018

Location: 450 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 40503

Dates: November 3-4 and November 17-18

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM each day

Applicants must be able to attend all 4 days of class

CMIT is an accredited 64-hour course that surpasses the recommended national training standards and requirements for national certification for Medical/Healthcare Interpreters. The course consists of 32 hours (4 days) of classroom instruction and an online component that takes up to 32 hours to complete.

Although the CMIT program is primarily intended for spoken languages, it provides American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters specialization training.

Individuals interested in taking this course first must pass a third-party language assessment. The results of the language assessment are yours to keep. The price of the language assessment varies from $70 to $115, depending on the working language being evaluated.

The price of the CMIT course is $450. Scholarships are NOT available for the Fall 2018 class. Students who attend all the hours of classroom training, complete the online portion AND receive a passing score of 70% or higher on their final exam will receive a certificate of completion.

To enroll in CMIT Fall 2018 by registering for a language assessment or to upload your proof of language proficiency, click here.

Languages assessments must be completed in the month of September to qualify for the November class so don’t wait.

2018 TAPIT ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Come attend the 2018 conference “Professional Empowerment in an Ever-Changing World“. This annual conference will be held in Nashville, September 14-15. View our conference agenda for more detailed information.

If you are interested in contributing to this event, the exhibitors and sponsors information is now available. Partnerships include opportunities to exhibit, speak to our members, and distribute promotional materials.

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The 12th Annual TAHIT Educational Symposium

“Eliminating Barriers to Equal Access: Tools for All Healthcare Professionals”

DoubleTree by Hilton San Antonio Airport
San Antonio, TX
September 21-22, 2018

TAHIT celebrates its 12th Anniversary Symposium in San Antonio in 2018!   Whether it is visiting the River Walk, spending a relaxing evening by the host hotel pool, or exploring the scenery of the Texas Hill Country with your favorite language professionals, San Antonio is a prime destination and host to the TAHIT Educational Symposium.

Texans and language professionals from across the country and abroad have come to rely on TAHIT to create an annual event that does not disappoint!  It is the premiere event for CEUs, networking, learning, great food, and great friends.  We do all this, while keeping our symposium the most affordable and highest quality in the nation, in our humble Texas opinion! This year we raise the bar once again.

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Navigating Healthcare, Court, and Conference Interpreting

Date: September 18, 1PM-2PM EST

Presenter: Liz Essary

Can any interpreter work anywhere, no matter the setting? What does it take to move from one setting to another? In this webinar, Liz Essary shares her experience moving from healthcare to court to conference interpreting, and back again. She will give specific examples of skills used in each setting, finding the differences and similarities among all settings.

This webinar is approved for 1 CE hour by CCHI and RID, and 0.1 IMIA/NBCMI CEUs (Education Registry ID 18-1320, expires on 07/30/2020). Cost: $25

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It’s Not Liberal Arts And Literature Majors Who Are Most Underemployed

Although it’s a popular target of those who insist that a college education should connect to a good job, majors in “Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities” left a scant 18,824 underemployed grads after five years. “English Language and Literature/Letters” had just 16,422 similarly underemployed. And the major with the fewest underemployed graduates, according to the report, was “Foreign Languages, Literature, and Linguistics.

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(Photo credits: AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)