In Many Courtrooms, Bad Interpreters Can Mean Justice Denied

Patricia Michelsen-King was observing the proceedings in a Chesterfield, Virginia, courtroom a few years ago when a man shouted in Spanish from the back of the courtroom, “I didn’t rape anybody!”

Michelsen-King, who teaches Spanish interpretation at Virginia Commonwealth University, said the outburst was the result of bad translation from his court interpreter. Though the man was accused of running a red light, his interpreter told him he was accused of a “violación”… keep reading

The difference between “qualified,” “certified” and having a certificate… and more FAQs

Some interpreters say they are “certified.” Is there a difference between qualified and certified interpreters?
A certified interpreter is an interpreter who is certified as competent by a professional organization or government entity through rigorous testing based on appropriate and consistent criteria. Interpreters who have had limited training or have taken a screening test administered by an employing health, interpreter or referral agency are not considered certified. Some programs offer a certificate of completion, but this does not equal certification.

A qualified interpreter is an individual who has been assessed for professional skills, demonstrates a high level of proficiency in at least two languages and has the appropriate training and experience to interpret with skill and accuracy while adhering to the National Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice published by the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care.
— Read on www.ncihc.org/faq-for-translators-and-interpreters

Ten must-do tasks for your first year as a freelance translator – Thoughts On Translation

Your first year as a freelancer is a time of overwhelming highs and lows, plus a whole lot of analysis paralysis (Should I work on my website? No, my resume! No, getting certified. No, my marketing plan! No, I have no idea how much to charge, so what on earth am I doing looking for clients…). That reality comes flooding back to me every time I talk to a beginning translator.

As with many hard-but-worthwhile endeavors in life, some of these trials cannot be circumvented; they can only be survived. There’s no way around them, only through them. But I do think that with a little focus, you can ease the stress of your first year as a freelancer. I’ve assembled a list of ten must-do items here
— Read on www.thoughtsontranslation.com/2019/01/29/ten-must-do-tasks-for-your-first-year-as-a-freelance-translator/

Clear the Linguistic Gap

For those who speak English fluently,the idea of language as a barrier to safe, effective health care might seem somewhat intangible and secondary to many other access-to-care issues. Then again, any English speaker who has ever had the experience of needing medical services in a non-English speaking nation will likely appreciate how crucial it can be to communicate effectively with those providing care.

For many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. or many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. While about 20 percent of the U.S. population claims a native language other than English, a reported subset of this population—around 25 million people, or nearly 9 percent of the population—can be classified as being limited English proficient (LEP). For these patients, communication barriers can pose potential risks to the safety and quality of the health care they receive.

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Member Spotlight: Jessica Sanchez

During the month of November, KITA would like to congratulate member Jessica Sánchez.

Earlier this year, the American Translators Association (ATA) announced that Jessica Sanchez, the interpreting coordinator for Fayette County Public Schools, would receive its 2018 School Outreach Program Award. More than 1,000 of her peers saluted Jessica during ATA’s annual conference Oct. 24-27 in New Orleans.

“We are thrilled to honor her effort in reaching out to students to educate them about promising careers in translation and interpreting,” said Corinne McKay, ATA president. “Her winning entry is a fitting testament to the lasting success of ATA’s School Outreach Program, which raises awareness of the role that translators and interpreters play in business, government, and society at large.”

To qualify for the national award, applicants must belong to ATA or an ATA-affiliated organization and must deliver a presentation at a school of their choice. Sanchez presented outreach sessions to several classes at Harrison Elementary’s Career Day, teaching students the difference between an interpreter and a translator, and demonstrating how interpreting headset equipment works as they listened to narrated stories simultaneously interpreted.

“Jessica is an outstanding asset to Fayette County Public Schools. Her dedication to serving students and families is inspiring, and her focus on continuous improvement and outreach is unmatched,” said Lori Bowen, director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, who oversees the district’s Interpreting & Translation Services.

Click here for original article.