The difference between “qualified,” “certified” and having a certificate… and more FAQs

Some interpreters say they are “certified.” Is there a difference between qualified and certified interpreters?
A certified interpreter is an interpreter who is certified as competent by a professional organization or government entity through rigorous testing based on appropriate and consistent criteria. Interpreters who have had limited training or have taken a screening test administered by an employing health, interpreter or referral agency are not considered certified. Some programs offer a certificate of completion, but this does not equal certification.

A qualified interpreter is an individual who has been assessed for professional skills, demonstrates a high level of proficiency in at least two languages and has the appropriate training and experience to interpret with skill and accuracy while adhering to the National Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice published by the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care.
— Read on www.ncihc.org/faq-for-translators-and-interpreters

Clear the Linguistic Gap

For those who speak English fluently,the idea of language as a barrier to safe, effective health care might seem somewhat intangible and secondary to many other access-to-care issues. Then again, any English speaker who has ever had the experience of needing medical services in a non-English speaking nation will likely appreciate how crucial it can be to communicate effectively with those providing care.

For many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. or many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. While about 20 percent of the U.S. population claims a native language other than English, a reported subset of this population—around 25 million people, or nearly 9 percent of the population—can be classified as being limited English proficient (LEP). For these patients, communication barriers can pose potential risks to the safety and quality of the health care they receive.

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Acting as a cultural broker: how medical interpreters navigate the patient-provider relationship | Twin Cities Daily Planet

The heart of Sergio Choy’s job as a medical interpreter is to capture the spirit of the message between patient and medical provider. “You hear things like, ‘I’m feeling a little blue today,’ in English, but not in other languages. You can’t feel a color in Spanish,” said Choy, who translates between English and Spanish, […]
— Read on www.tcdailyplanet.net/medical-interpeters/

2018 TAPIT ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Come attend the 2018 conference “Professional Empowerment in an Ever-Changing World“. This annual conference will be held in Nashville, September 14-15. View our conference agenda for more detailed information.

If you are interested in contributing to this event, the exhibitors and sponsors information is now available. Partnerships include opportunities to exhibit, speak to our members, and distribute promotional materials.

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