The Medical Interpreter Newsletter (MAY)

Scholarships for National Certification

Congratulations to those who are certified medical/healthcare interpreters. Our role of language professionals is very rewarding, and it is time for us to exponentially increase the advocacy for our field. If you are not certified or know someone who needs their certification, share this message now since there are only 10 days left to apply for one of the 5 scholarships offered by CCHI and NBCMI. Details below, and Audio interviews will be posted later this week…

 

Deadline is May 31st and Winners will be announced in 6 to 8 weeks! Spread the word!

From The Medical Interpreter Newsletter (MAY)
— Read on www.dversidad.com/so/e1MgYktmG

10 Online Continuing Education Providers

Whether you are a certified interpreter or translator, a qualified language service professional or an aspiring newcomer, education is a vital part of your professional development. Below is a list of educational institutions, professional associations and other agencies that offer online continuing education opportunities. This list is by no means authoritative nor exhaustive nor is it in any particular order.

  1. International Medical Interpreters Association (IMIA)
  2. Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI)
  3. Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID)
  4. American Translators Association (ATA)
  5. University of Arizona National Center for Interpretation (NCI)
  6. Southern California School for Interpreting
  7. Interpreter Education Online
  8. National Institue for Coordinated Healthcare (NICHC)
  9. InterpretAmerica
  10. Martti

Are you a professional interpreter or translator? Where do you go for education and professional development? We’d love to hear from you. Drop us a line here.

Clear the Linguistic Gap

For those who speak English fluently,the idea of language as a barrier to safe, effective health care might seem somewhat intangible and secondary to many other access-to-care issues. Then again, any English speaker who has ever had the experience of needing medical services in a non-English speaking nation will likely appreciate how crucial it can be to communicate effectively with those providing care.

For many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. or many, language challenges in health care are indeed front and center. While about 20 percent of the U.S. population claims a native language other than English, a reported subset of this population—around 25 million people, or nearly 9 percent of the population—can be classified as being limited English proficient (LEP). For these patients, communication barriers can pose potential risks to the safety and quality of the health care they receive.

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